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Boxer Crazy Forum | Boxer Health | General Health | Topic: Vetalog...? « previous next »
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Ratfingers
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« on: August 25, 2008, 03:30:15 AM »

Cash is soo allerigic, not sure to what (may be himself) he scratches himself raw. I have tried benedryl with minimal results. But, for $30, a vetalog shot every 4 -6 weeks works wonders. Can anyone tell me the pro/cons of this. I know that it is a steroid, which scares me, but nothing else works, and he is miserable scratching everywhere when it wears off (he has only had two shots in two years, but it works). Help...
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amandaw
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« Reply #1 on: August 25, 2008, 07:42:02 AM »

It's great that you found something that works. Here's an article on the veterinary use of corticosteroids.

http://www.peteducation.com/article.cfm?articleid=1422

The article does include a warning about Vetalog:
"Most veterinarians today prefer not to use the long-acting injectable products like triamcinolone (Vetalog) or the methylprednisolone product Depo-Medrol. They are usually fine for a single injection but their repeated use in the same animal can cause suppression of the hypophyseal section of the brain and pituitary gland and other side effects. When long-term therapy is being considered, it is much better and easier to use oral forms like the short-acting prednisone or prednisolone tablets on an every-other-day schedule. With tablets, the dosage can be quickly changed at any time. With long-acting injections, nothing can be done to alter the effect once the product is in the animal's body."


And another one...
http://www.drugs.com/vet/vetalog-parenteral-veterinary.html
with this warning: "Not for use in horses intended for food."   Eek!
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Bers
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« Reply #2 on: August 25, 2008, 09:05:56 AM »

I use oral Vetalog for Koda's allergies when he has an emergency or when he's mutilating himself and nothing else is working. But it's a last stop measure and with every dose I worry about the possible long term damage I may be doing to my boy.

If you do choose to use it I would recommend you keep searching for better solutions in the meantime. There are different bathing or topical treatment options, as well as different kinds of antihistamines (not all work for every dog so you often have to trial them to find what works). The most important thing is to try to find out what the triggers are, so keep investigating. Remove things from the environment one at a time until you find out what is causing the problem. Remember allergens can be from indoors or outdoors, don't forget mold, dust, perfumes and dyes, etc.
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blynn03
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« Reply #3 on: August 25, 2008, 09:56:03 AM »

I have a dog that has pretty bad allergies (Bella), here are some of the things I did:

I started using Seventh Generation surface cleaner...which is all natural.  I also use an all natural laundry detergent (forget the name right now).  I quit using the air freshener I had (Febreze Noticeables plug in thingy). 

And in addition to all of these...I tried several foods until I found what worked for her.  I never completely believed it was food related until her allergies all but completely went away once I got her on Natural Balance duck & potato formula.



(Oh yeah...she's never been given any steroids.  I would say that her allergies were bad, but not as severe as say, Koda's.  I worked with a holistic vet, so for me, steroids were a last resort that I never had to resort to.  She would scratch really badly and had some raw spots...but never got to the point that she was really "mutilating" herself.  I would have gone the steroid route if she had, but luckily never had to.)
Last Edit: August 25, 2008, 09:58:01 AM by blynn03 Logged

*Brandy*

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tonyboxers
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« Reply #4 on: August 25, 2008, 10:17:13 AM »

Nikita had a allergic episode a couple of months ago and vet gave her a shot of vetalog.Took care of it withen hours.However the next day she had diarrea and vomit.Called the vet and he felt it was from the shot.
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Ratfingers
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« Reply #5 on: August 25, 2008, 01:34:17 PM »

Thanks everyone. I've talked to my vet several times about his allergies, and I have tried all different single protein/non grain foods. But because we spend every night out side, I think it is harder to figure out the cause, he could be allerigic to pollens which are bad year round in this town. I just hate to see him being so miserable with the constant scratching and raw/red neck. He also has bumps across his back which could be from bugs etc...I've never used a flea collar b/c we don't have fleas in this desert, but we sure get some big horse flies. I will keep trying alternate routes and continue to talk with the vet for some less harmful solutions.
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~Julie~
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Bers
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« Reply #6 on: August 25, 2008, 10:12:35 PM »

I think it's the best you can do. Just keep looking for the best solutions. Being aware of the possible consequences means you'll be more likely to use the steroids cautiously, so you're already way ahead of a lot of other pet owners who see lifetime steroid maintenance as totally acceptable and safe.

Koda also gets those bumps across his back and on his sides and his legs when he's been outdoors in the summer. I don't think it's bug bites, I think it's hives, but I have no way to know for sure. The Benadryl usually does the trick for him in those cases, but not the pink Benadryl - he has to have dye-free.
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Ratfingers
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« Reply #7 on: August 25, 2008, 11:23:44 PM »

I haven't tried the dye free, I use the quick dissolve strips, these are hard enough to get down, I don't know how I can catch, hold and force the liquid down he will spit it out. Over this last week, I have been wetting a cloth with ACV/water and rubbing him down with it, it seems to help, I've noticed today that he hasn"t been scratching as much...Fingers crossed
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~Julie~
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Bers
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« Reply #8 on: August 25, 2008, 11:57:38 PM »

I've only ever given Koda Benadryl in pill form. I think the liquid is too expensive, and it simply never occurred to me to give him one of those strips! laugh4 Plus, I'm pretty sure the pills are the only ones that come in a dye-free version.

It's not hard to give a dog a pill, and if you follow it with a treat they may actually learn to do it pretty willingly. You never know when you might be in a situation where your dog requires oral medication, so practicing now with the small Benadryl capsules might be a good idea.
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Ratfingers
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« Reply #9 on: August 26, 2008, 12:05:49 AM »

Do you "hide" the pill in cheese or something? I have to wrap the dissolve strips in cheese to fool him, but he still figures out how to spit out the part with the strip  inquisitive
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~Julie~
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Bers
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« Reply #10 on: August 26, 2008, 12:15:11 AM »

Nope, I do it the old fashioned way. If he wants to cooperate he keeps his tongue out of the way and the pill goes at the back and is easily swallowed. If he wants to give me trouble then I have to work around the tongue, and if he spits it out he gets to go through the process again. I used to have him trained pretty well to just open up and take the pill, but my "untrainer" has been "helping" me by giving Koda pills and I've noticed a lot more of a struggle lately. brood Koda's been taking pills of some kind since he was about 4 months old, so I can't see fussing around with it - just take the pill, get your treat, and everyone is happy. Grin
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Ratfingers
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« Reply #11 on: August 26, 2008, 12:19:47 AM »

Oh, lucky you! Cash isn't much of a food/treat wh*re, he would rather not take the meds as have the treat  confused
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~Julie~
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Bers
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« Reply #12 on: August 26, 2008, 12:26:21 AM »

You can always give him a reward that he will appreciate. And if nothing else, the reward is that you stop shoving the pill down his throat. Grin
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